Showing 1 - 20 of 33 results for Authors and illustrators

Supporting Australian book creators

By The ELR team

Issue 106, Term 3 2018

Consider those copies of Old Tom or Looking for Alibrandi that are sitting on your library’s shelves. What stories do these books have to tell? How many readers have held these books while absorbing their words — whether in the library, in the classroom, or in their homes? Each time a library book i

The library, the child, the book creator: ELR and its role in the story cycle

By Tania McCartney

Issue 107, Term 4 2018

When I was very small, books were my world. When I got bigger, they were still my world — only perhaps a little richer, more nuanced and complex.  Now that I’m biggest of all, books are not only the richness, nuance and complexity that comes with the sheer enjoyment of reading — they are my every da

Supporting Australian book creators

By Nicole Richardson

Issue 104, Term 1 2018

In Term 4 of 2017, SCIS invited 750 Australian schools to participate in the Educational Lending Right (ELR) School Library Survey. We received 364 responses to the survey, surpassing the required minimum of 300. We are grateful to all school library, teaching and administrative staff who recognised

ELR, or the super fund you have when you don’t have a super fund

By Nadia Wheatley

Issue 103, Term 4 2017

ave got older, Lending Right payments have become even more important to me, and to many other book creators as well. Unlike most Australian workers, authors and illustrators don’t get superannuation. Sure, I can join a super fund myself. But I do not have an employer contributing to my fund, to mak

Supporting Australian book creators

By Nicole Richardson

Issue 101, Term 2 2017

Many of you will by now be familiar with the Educational Lending Right (ELR), a cultural program funded by the Australian Government. ELR provides annual payments to eligible members of the writing and publishing industry. The Department of Communications and the Arts invites eligible publishers and

Supporting Australian book creators

By Nicole Richardson, Frances Watts

Issue 100, Term 1 2017

It is, indeed, their primary source of books. Of course, this means that many of our readers are not actually buying our books, and without an income authors and illustrators can’t afford to create. This is why the ELR scheme is so important and so worthwhile: by compensating book creators for the l

Supporting Australian book creators

By Nicole Richardson, Morris Gleitzman

Issue 99, Term 4 2016

Every year, SCIS works closely with the Department of Communications and the Arts to conduct a survey of book holdings in Australian school libraries. This is the ELR School Library Survey, and it is integral to the growth of the Australian writing and publishing industry. The survey produces estima

Supporting Australian book creators

By Nicole Richardson

Issue 97, Term 2 2016

Every year, the Department of Communications and the Arts makes payments to eligible book creators — including authors, illustrators and publishers, to name a few — for having their work held in Australian school and academic libraries. This program is called the Educational Lending Right (ELR) — a

Supporting Australian book creators

By Laura Armstrong, Toni Jordan

Issue 95, Term 4 2015

all participating schools to provide feedback about their experience via a quick online form, to enable us to improve future ELR surveys. Australian authors and illustrators value school libraries When a school is invited to participate in the ELR school library survey, it is a fantastic opportunit

Supporting Australian book creators

By Laura Armstrong

Issue 94, Term 3 2015

What Educational Lending Right (ELR) means to me… Hazel Edwards As a long-term author with a considerable backlist, PLR and ELR payments confirm that my work is being read by multiple readers for each individual library copy.Culturally this means my stories are shared, and the ideas discussed but al

Supporting Australian book creators

By Laura Armstrong

Issue 93, Term 2 2015

Every year in September/October, 600 Australian schools are invited to provide book count data for the Educational Lending Right (ELR) school library survey. The data collected is used to estimate the number of copies of Australian books held in Australian school libraries. These estimates are then

Supporting Australian book creators

By Laura Armstrong, Gus Gordon

Issue 92, Term 1 2015

2014-15 ELR school library survey is finished We have had a fantastic response to the Educational Lending Right (ELR) 2014-15 school library survey. In October 2014, we invited 600 schools to participate in the survey. 325 schools generously provided book-data reports from their library management s

Emily Rodda on treasured stories

By Nicole Richardson

Issue 108, Term 1 2019

 Emily Rodda’s life has been a whirlwind of stories. Her family's bond formed not between the pages of books, but between the silences and laughter of their own storytelling. At a young age, Emily taught herself to read by absorbing the words from the books borrowed from her school and municipal lib

Supporting Australian book creators

By Aaron Blabey

Issue 108, Term 1 2019

When I began writing books professionally in 2006, I had never heard of the Australian Lending Right Schemes. My publisher just handed me a form, which I blithely filled out and promptly forgot all about. Then, after a hair-raising period filled with newborn children, an elephantine mortgage, and mo

The cathartic experience: understanding grief through the written word

By Nicole Richardson

Issue 106, Term 3 2018

Eliza Henry Jones is well-acquainted with the power of the written word. Her literary work is an achingly beautiful exploration of grief, loss and trauma — themes that she understands are capable of helping readers make sense of their own experiences. Indeed, the writing experience itself has had a

Stories make us: in conversation with Morris Gleitzman

By Nicole Richardson

Issue 105, Term 2 2018

In February, award-winning children’s author Morris Gleitzman was named the new Australian Children’s Laureate for 2018–19. As laureate, he will join his predecessors, Leigh Hobbs, Jackie French, Alison Lester and Boori Monty Pryor in promoting the importance of reading. Morris kindly shared his tim

An inquiry-based approach to exploring Australian history

By Deborah Abela

Issue 99, Term 4 2016

In the last few years, we have witnessed the largest movement of people since World War II, and both periods resonate with themes of fear, persecution, escape, identity, and hope. This made me think of my own family’s history and how, when my father was a young boy, he left his war-ravaged home of M

1,000 reasons to support Australian book creators

By Jackie French

Issue 97, Term 2 2016

Dear Jackie French,What I have learned from your book is to be wary of anyone who tries to make you angry.Love James James was 14, and Hitler’s Daughter was the first book he had ever read. Yet he had found the truth behind a question I had been hunting for ever since I was ten years old: how did Hi

The writing (and revising) of The innovative school librarian

By Elizabeth Bentley

Issue 111, Term 4 2019

I was one of a group of school librarians, initially composed of students on the MAEd course at Canterbury Christ Church, tutored by Sharon Markless, and later joined by Sarah Pavey. We continued to meet regularly with Sharon to discuss research and other issues related to school librarianship. Shar

Morris Gleitzman on the uniquely contributive role of school libraries

By Morris Gleitzman

Issue 109, Term 2 2019

During my time as Australian Children’s Laureate, I have continued to visit many schools — something I have been doing for about 30 years. I speak to lots of school library staff, because of my long-held interest in the health of school libraries. Over the last 18 months, this has been particularly

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